Ten Steps to Take to Make Your IVF Successful………….

Introduction
Apart from the age, many factors like height, weight, and ovarian reserve, history of previous IVF cycles, sperm quantity and quality affect the success rate of in vitro fertilization.

Thus, success of an IVF attempt depends on a comprehensive evaluation of the couple.

1. Women should, at the outset go for an evaluation of their uterine cavity for fibroids, polyps and other suspicious tissues that prevent a successful embryo implant

2. The next important step is the evaluation of the fallopian tubes for abnormal fluid accumulation that reduces the IVF success rate

3. Investigate if you have enough eggs in the ovary since an adequate ovarian reserve is vital for an IVF success

4. Go for a preimplantation genetic screening that includes biopsy of blastocysts and genetic testing of all 23 chromosomes

5. When you are advised to freeze embryos for a future IVF cycle, look for clinics that use modern technology and have a good embryo freezing program.

6. Get the sperm quantity and quality analysis done preferably in the same fertility clinic where IVF is being attempted

7. Have a good sleep of about seven to eight hours at night
Research studies have confirmed that a moderate and good night sleep is essential for a good reproductive health. Excess sleep beyond nine hours and inadequate sleep less than six hours have been shown to deter IVF success rates.

8. Have a healthy and doctor advised regulated life style after an embryo transfer
Studies have established that a complete bed rest period beyond 24 hours bed rest after an embryo transfer hinders the success rate of an IVF cycle while a too short rest period is equally detrimental. Hence, it is good to have a brief bed rest and go into a routine as advised by the doctor.

9. Evaluate the prescriptions, supplements, and herbs you have been taking
Though studies have confirmed that a drug melatonin might be useful in treating infertility, it is definitely essential to talk to the doctor and take his approval to take the drug during an IVF cycle. Modern medicine for IVF does encourage supplements and herbs to enhance the success rate but only after physician evaluation.

10. Stress is the worst deterrent. Avoid stress
A research study has established the presence of two stress biomarkers in women namely, alpha-amylase and cortisol. Those who have elevated levels of alpha-amylase are at risk of infertility. Stress has a direct as well as an indirect influence by affecting the sperm count, reducing the follicles and reproductive hormone levels.

Thus, for a successful IVF, it is not only imperative to confirm that the physicians are qualified from Indian Medical Council in their respective IVF specialities but also ensure that the chosen clinic is not just cheap but also transparent, scientifically compliant to handle the latest IVF techniques available, easily accessible to approach them for your doubts and accountable with responsible updates.

Have a balanced diet, regular prescribed physical exercise, avoid smoking, and desist from alcohol intake in any form and drug abuse obviously.

          Info graphics depicting the success rate of IVF with age Source: http://www.ivf.org

Reference

  • Moreton, Cole (14 January 2007). “World’s first test-tube baby Louise Brown has a child of her own”. London: Independent. Retrieved 21 May 2010. After IVF, some couples get pregnant without help”. Reuters. 2012-05-03. Retrieved 2015-11-05.
  • Adamson, G.D.; Tabangin, M.; Macaluso, M.; Mouzon, J. de. “The number of babies born globally after treatment with the assisted reproductive technologies (ART)”. Fertility and Sterility. 100 (3): S42. doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2013.07.1807.
  • Fertility: assessment and treatment for people with fertility problems. NICE clinical guideline ;– Issued: February 2013.
  • Broer SL, van Disseldorp J, Broeze KA, Dolleman M, Opmeer BC, Bossuyt P, Eijkemans MJ, Mol BW, Broekmans FJ (2012). “Added value of ovarian reserve testing on patient characteristics in the prediction of ovarian response and ongoing pregnancy: An individual patient data approach”. Human Reproduction Update. 19 (1): 26–36.

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